The Lawfare Podcast: A Digital Contact Tracing Retrospective

Jen Patja, Jacob Schulz, Alan Z. Rozenshtein
Monday, June 7, 2021, 12:00 PM

Published by The Lawfare Institute
in Cooperation With
Brookings

It's been more than a year since the first contact tracing and exposure notification apps for the novel coronavirus have appeared, and the apps have not at all lived up to the hype. In fact, they've almost invariably stumbled or not really worked at all. Jacob Schulz sat down with Alan Rozenshtein, associate professor of law at the University of Minnesota School of Law and a senior editor at Lawfare, and Susan Landau, a professor of Cyber Security and Policy at Tufts and a senior contributor for Lawfare, to talk about digital disease surveillance during the COVID-19 pandemic. Alan has recently published a law review article about digital disease surveillance and Susan has recently published a book on the contact tracing apps. What went wrong, and what are the lessons to be learned?




Jen Patja is the editor and producer of The Lawfare Podcast and Rational Security. She currently serves as the Co-Executive Director of Virginia Civics, a nonprofit organization that empowers the next generation of leaders in Virginia by promoting constitutional literacy, critical thinking, and civic engagement. She is the former Deputy Director of the Robert H. Smith Center for the Constitution at James Madison's Montpelier and has been a freelance editor for over 20 years.
Jacob Schulz is the former managing editor of Lawfare. He previously served as deputy managing editor and associate editor. He hails from Pennylvania and attended Amherst College.
Alan Z. Rozenshtein is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Minnesota Law School, a senior editor at Lawfare, and a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Previously, he served as an Attorney Advisor with the Office of Law and Policy in the National Security Division of the U.S. Department of Justice and a Special Assistant United States Attorney in the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Maryland.

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