The Lawfare Podcast: Trust, Software and Hardware

Jen Patja, Benjamin Wittes, David Hoffman
Monday, February 22, 2021, 12:00 PM

Published by The Lawfare Institute
in Cooperation With
Brookings

David Hoffman is associate general counsel and global privacy officer for the Intel Corporation, as well as the Steed Family Professor of Practice in Cybersecurity Policy for Duke's Sanford School of Public Policy. He invited Benjamin Wittes to give a talk to a group of students about trust and technology development in which they discussed what the components of trust really are, how many of them are technical and how many of them involve other things like corporate governance, including brand and the regulatory environment in which products are produced.




Jen Patja is the editor and producer of The Lawfare Podcast and Rational Security. She currently serves as the Co-Executive Director of Virginia Civics, a nonprofit organization that empowers the next generation of leaders in Virginia by promoting constitutional literacy, critical thinking, and civic engagement. She is the former Deputy Director of the Robert H. Smith Center for the Constitution at James Madison's Montpelier and has been a freelance editor for over 20 years.
Benjamin Wittes is editor in chief of Lawfare and a Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution. He is the author of several books.
David Hoffman is Associate General Counsel and Global Privacy Officer at Intel, in which capacity he oversees Intel’s privacy activities and security policy engagements. Mr. Hoffman has served on the FTC Online Access and Security Advisory Committee and the DHS Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee. From 2005–2009, Mr. Hoffman served on the Board of Directors for the International Association of Privacy Professionals and he is currently a member of the Advisory Board for the Future of Privacy Forum. He has lectured on privacy and security law at schools in the US, Europe, Japan and China and is a Senior Lecturing Fellow at his alma mater, Duke University School of Law.

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